Northwest Bloodhounds Search and Rescue
Home
Mission Statement
History
Bloodhound Training
Handler Training
Welcome Letter
Favorite Links
Contact Us
Hug-a-Tree
Photo Gallery
History
Northwest Bloodhounds Search and Rescue is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization, registered with the Secretary of State in Washington, and the Internal Revenue Service.
Northwest Bloodhounds is funded through donations and member dues. Qualified handlers are registered with the Washington State Department of Emergency Management.
The current membership is comprised of people interested in serving the community as volunteers in search and rescue, trailing bloodhounds. Members of NWBSAR come from all walks of life. The membership roster includes full voting adult members, initiate members, and Auxiliary
Northwest Bloodhounds Search and Rescue has been in existence since 1973, Founded by Clyde Reed and his wife Lena. (Lena passed away in 2000, Clyde passed away in 2007) The membership has grown from six members, to over thirty dues paying members.
Northwest Bloodhound members are all volunteers. We respond to calls from law enforcement agencies to assist in searching for lost or overdue hunters, fishermen and hikers, children, and walk always from nursing homes. We also assist the law enforcement agencies in evidence and cadaver searches and some of the handlers are attending training for disaster work.
Members are not compensated for the time that they dedicate, some handlers are using precious vacation time to respond on searches. Despite being volunteers, handlers must continue to seek and receive training in a number of different areas. They must document actual and training missions and constantly upgrade their skills and abilities.
Without documentation and continued education and training, handlers risk injury, failure, and liability in the field. NWBSAR offers a variety of training throughout the year, covering many topics. This would include mock searches, classroom training in various areas, and fieldwork.
In the first sixteen years of public service, qualified handlers have responded to over six hundred (600) searches. Call outs were from law enforcement agencies in Washington, Ore.